iDance. iTarot. iArt.

Bellydance, Tarot reading, and artwork with some meanderings for good measure. Navigating life as best as possible.

Yes, by all means, ask me a question if you have one. I don't bite. Most of the time. I'm also a Tarot reader. So if you want a reading, either donate (by clicking that awesomely yellow button below) OR click "Get A Reading!". Thanks for coming!






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kays-grimoire:

"Reincarnation Spread" from Sylvia Abraham’s How To Use Tarot Spreads

  1. Who was I in my most recent lifetime?
  2. Was I married?
  3. Was I happy?
  4. What kind of work did I do?
  5. Was I an honorable person?
  6. What type of challenges did I face?
  7. Was I famous?
  8. Was I healthy?
  9. How did I die?
  10. Did I meet my soul mate?
  11. Is my present lover someone I knew during my past life?
  12. Am I linked to my parents of today from my past life?
  13. Are any other members of my family from my past life?
  14. What do I need to learn during this lifetime?
  15. Will I reincarnate after this life?

(via tarotismyreligion)

(via kuzannagi)

the-goddamazon:

generalbriefing:

amazelife:

renamok:

The Valiant Little Tailor

Jack and the Beanstalk

Beauty and the Beast

Pinocchio

Thumbelina

Puss in Boots

The Twelve Dancing Princesses

The Little Mermaid

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves

The Princess and the Pauper

The Snow Queen

HBO’s “Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child” 1995 - 2000

(from the same people who eventually brought us “The Proud Family”)

Attention
bluishtigerrs
:)

My kids still watch these

I was watching these clean through high school because my dad had HBO.

fiftyshadesofmacygray:

it’s important to make friendships that are deeper than gossiping and drinking and smoking and going out.

make friends who you can go get breakfast with, make friends you can cry with, make friends who support your life goals and believe in you.

(via raychillster)

Bring trolled by Oshun is kind of fun. Because SHE IS fun. Trolled me through the instructor of today’s workshop who said:

"You don’t smile much when you dance. You don’t smile much at all! You need more Oshun!"

Okay, okay. I’ll build your altar this week. Gonna be a minute before the fancy honey and candles though…and the painting. Yes, the painting. I haven’t forgotten. 😧

I love Zoe Saldana’s work. I’ve seen some of her movies more than once and really enjoy what she brings to the screen. As an actress I respect her process, but I also know that there are many actresses out there, known or not, who would be great as my mother. The one actress that I’ve had in my heart for a very long time, whose work I’m familiar with already, is Kimberly Elise. Many people have spoken to me about Viola. I love her look. I love her energy. Both of the actresses that I’ve mentioned are women of color, are women with beautiful, luscious lips and wide noses, and who know their craft. I also have no problem introducing someone we’ve never heard of before who can play my mother. How does someone just decide to do a story about someone and completely bypass family? Completely bypass her representatives? … I talked with [the director, Cynthia Mort] once, about a year and a half ago. It was very emotional for me to just get on the phone with her because there were so many questions in my mind… I asked her if her mother was still alive. I asked her if she still had a good relationship with her mother and she sounded like a really nice lady. She really, really believes in what she’s doing. I do remember saying to her that if any of us tried to take the story of Bing Crosby or, Dean Martin, or Frank Sinatra, or Elvis Presley and turn it into something that was a tall tale based on something that never happened, I doubt that we’d get very far. My mother’s life was tragic enough. My mother suffered enough. Her life is full of enough wonderful and tragic true things to make a hit movie. You don’t have to embellish her story.

onlyblackgirl:

"OMG you’re so dark"

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"So where in Africa are you from? Nigeria? 

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"Make sure you marry a light skin man/woman or your kids will be too dark"

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"You should tone down the bright colors, it makes your dark skin stand out too much"

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"You’re actually cute for a dark skin girl/guy"

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*Insert midnight/disappearing in dark joke here*

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(via whitepeoplestealingculture)

kemetic-dreams:

Head wraps have served as a head cover for Africans, mostly women, since at least the early 1700s. According to Danya London Fashions For , a group of African(People who come from a sunny place,that is the birth place of humans and civilization. Tamazight,Medu Neter language) slave women appear in a 1707 painting that was created by Dirk Valkenburg, a Danish painter, that depicted them wearing head wraps that appeared high on the forehead and above the ears. However, it is believed that African cultures used head wraps before the days of slavery so that men could show off their wealth and the level of their social status and so that women could prove that they were prosperous and spiritual

African head wraps come in many bright bold colors that animate the face. According to Africa Imports African Business, in West Africa, head wraps are referred to as “gele" in Yoruba or “ichafu" in Ibgo. Some African American women continue to wear head wraps to boast their spiritual strength.

Egypt(Kemet)

  • Many of the headdresses worn by Egyptian royalty had their roots in Nubian culture. The “Nubian wig” purposefully resembled the thick hair of Nubian people. Depictions from the 18th Dynasty show both Kiya, a secondary wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten, and Tiye, the mother of Akhenaten and Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III, wearing this headdress. Queens(Ngst,Amharic) during the Amarna era typically wore the “khat,” a single-colored headcloth.

 

Nubia(Ta Seti)

  • Ancient Nubian queens wore headdresses more than head wraps. Some headdresses consisted of elaborate fabrics and flowers woven together. Another headdress had the appearance of a vulture, later referred to as the Egyptian double crown and worn by Egyptian queens during the New Kingdom era.



Nigeria

  • "Gele" refers to the Yoruba word for the head wrap commonly associated with Nigeria and West Africa. Both common women and royal queens wore the gele in ancient times, but queens had wraps made of finer material, such as damask — often used for special occasions and worn with a shawl — and colorful aso-oke, material made of silk.

Slave Women and the Head-Wrap

Originally the head-wrap, or turban, was worn by both enslaved men and women. In time, however, it became almost exclusively a female accessory. In the photograph above, the women wear head-wraps, while the men wear hats.

For their white European masters, the slaves’ head-wraps were signs of poverty and subordination. Accounts of clothing distribution show that masters sometimes allotted extra handkerchiefs to their female slaves, ostensibly to be used as head coverings. In fact, in certain areas of the South, legislation appeared that required Afrakan women to wear their hair bound up in this manner.

The head-wrap, however, was more than a badge of enslavement imposed on female slaves by their owners. Embellishment of the head and hair was a central component of dress in various parts of Africa, particularly in West Africa. From the time European fabrics were made available to them, African women wore head-wraps similar to those worn by their enslaved counterparts in America. For these women, the wrap, which varied in form from region to region, signified communal identity. At the same time, the particular appearance of an individual head-wrap was an expression of personal identity.

Detail from the photo of a large group of women wearing head-wraps

In America, the head-wrap was a utilitarian item, which kept the slave’s hair protected from the elements in which she worked and helped to curb the spread of lice. Yet, as in Africa, the head-wrap also created community — as an item shared by female slaves — and individuality, as a thing unique to the wearer. Cassandra Stancil, enslaved in her youth, insisted that she never asked another woman how to tie her head-scarf. “I always figured I could do it,” she said, “I could try and experiment and if not get that, get something that I liked.”

The head-wrap was an object of oppression from one vantage point. But from the other, the perspective of the slave community, it was a vehicle of empowerment and a memento of freedom.

The headwrap which originated in sub-Saharan Africa carried symbolic meaning in reference to spirituality, wealth, prosperity and class. It later took on a prominent identity in the times of the slavery in America and thereafter continued to be a fashionable but conscientious statement for women of African origin.

The colorful wraps also kept a person eyes to the face of a woman and not her body!

AFRAKANS(PEOPLE WHO COME FROM A SUNNY PLACE,THAT IS THE ORIGIN OF HUMANS AND CIVILIZATION. TAMAZIGHT,MEDU NETER LANGUAGE)

(via afrodesiacworldwide)

blackhistoryalbum:

HOG WILD | 1918

1918 photograph of Vernon Coffey and Virgil McNeal in France - 806th Pioneer Infantry Regiment, 2nd Army, AEF. (National WWI Museum)

Via Black History Album on Pinterest

metaphysical-technicality:

Just so we’re clear.

(via blackgirlsrpretty2)